What’s wrong with this picture?

On the ANZ Direct Online (DLO) business banking site we see ANZ are dropping support for Chrome…

Good on ya ANZ

Wiki tells us Chrome is the most popular browser…

wiki browser stats

The NZ Herald tells us ANZ ranks bottom in the 2015 NZ Banking customer survey

2015 banking satisfaction survey

And also in the Herald we see the top paid CEO in New Zealand is the ANZ CEO!

ANZ CEO

So I guess there is nothing wrong with this picture, it all hangs together nicely.

anz

Come on ANZ, lift your game – this really isn’t good enough! Your Direct Online business banking website is dreadful (and you charge $29 a month to use it!!), you have no direct bank feeds to Xero for your credit cards and your internet banking is down. Maybe pay your CEO a bit less and spend the savings on sorting our your IT systems.

If you could sort out your IT systems you might become our favourite bank.

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Disclaimer: I have nothing personal against the ANZ, some of my best friends work there :-), it is just that their java requiring Direct Online site is an insult to anyone who has to use it. If you want to see how to do it properly check out BNZ’s site.

 

Cuba Libre

Having just returned from Cuba a few weeks ago I was delighted to learn yesterday that the 45 day legislative objection period had lapsed without objection, and the US had removed Cuba from its blacklist of terrorist countries, allowing diplomatic relations to be restored as a first step in easing trade and economic sanctions.IMG_3795

Clearly this is going to have huge changes for Cuba and they are in a unique position to choose what changes they want and how they want to change, having observed world progress over the last 50 years. I’m glad I got to see the country before these changes. Cubans secured their independence from Spain in 1898, were boycotted by the US over 50 years ago, and then abandoned by the Soviet Union in 1990 with the break up of the Soviet Union.

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For the last 25 years they have operated in a virtual wilderness. This is reflected in the iconic 1950s vehicles that we associate with Cuba. Interestingly these are now being imported from the US as they are a major tourist attraction.

The reality is that most of the cars are that old and many of the buildings are crumbling although the government is working to rebuild some of the classic older buildings, retaining their facades. It also partners with non-US hotel chains to build hotels, particularly in the capital, Havana, to provide for the tourists, a major source of revenue.

Our trip included driving through the country side, on highways with little traffic but lots of horses and carts, while oxen ploughed the fields. Almost everything is homegrown. So when we saw lamb on the menu we asked where they graze their sheep since it is so close to the equator. Apparently their “sheep” have horns and are what we call goats. But lamb is better understood by the tourist so lamb it is.

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Our visit to the cigar factory showed rows of people hand rolling cigars – the country produces around 1 million a day. Everything is very labour intensive with locals earning around $US10 a month. Tourists use a different currency aligned with the US dollar.

So what does change look like for Cubans we spoke to? They know they don’t want fast food outlets on every corner or multi-national chain stores throughout the main streets. They’re looking forward to greater opportunity to run their own businesses, a higher standard of living, more access to the internet and the outside world, and the opportunity to travel – things we take so much for granted.

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I’m looking forward to re-visiting in 5 years to see Cuba then.